Why did the chicken…

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This is my kitchen; these are my chickens.

We’ll get to this picture, but first: one thing I’ve learned from my chickens is how lame “to get to the other side” really is as a possible reason chickens might cross a road. I get that it’s supposed to be anti-humorously offering the obvious, but I detect a presumption that chickens would be aware of things like 1) a road, 2) that there is one side and also another side. I would suggest instead:

  • because someone walked up behind it and it got scared
  • because it’s raining (everywhere)
  • to follow its colleague
  • because a smaller chicken in that direction seems to be eating something or having fun and NO MUST STOP
  • to nap in some dirt
  • because it’ll be kind of inconvenient for you

 

So anyway: Why did the chicken walk into the kitchen?

To be the lifter of the filter, so to fill the chipper pitcher, from the faucet near the soffit (and… the door was open wide).

Does anyone have a name for such word pairs? A kind of almost rhyme but more precise than slant…it’s not quite spoonerisms, but almost…sort of (partial) phonetic reversal…sort of (intentional, non-adjacent) metathesis…surely there’s just a word for two such related words? Also, I don’t think it’s sananmuunos because it’s not Finnish, but those sound amazing.


One thought on “Why did the chicken…

  1. Hi Sarah – I’ve been studying phonemic repetition in Woolf, with examples of echos – simple, compound, solid, train (polysyllabic), caps & spurs & more, plus reversals in same. For instance: “darkness covered” – the d, r & k in darkness, reversed in covered. Chiasmus is the name for reversed structure, inverted parallelism (like ABBA in poetry), including, for example: “when the going gets tough the tough get going” & “I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy” – but that may be specific to clauses rather the more subtle word pairings. Much more with analysis of whole passages in Reverberations by Kathleen McCluskey. Cheers! Ali

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